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Joint Injections

What are joint injections?

Joint injections reduce inflammation and can be effective when delivered directly into the painful area. The pain relief can last from days to years, allowing your condition to improve with physical therapy and an exercise program.
Injections can be made in the following areas:


facet joints of the spine.

sacroiliac joint and coccyx.

hip joint.

shoulder, elbow, and hand.

knee, ankle, and foot.

Some quick information

If you have pain stemming from joint inflammation, then you may benefit from a steroid injection. Typically, a joint injection is recommended for those who do not respond to other conservative treatments, such as oral anti-inflammatory medication, rest or physical therapy.

Steroid joint injections done using fluoroscopic (x-ray) guidance should NOT be performed on people who have an infection, are pregnant, or have bleeding problems. The injection may slightly elevate blood sugar levels in patients with diabetes. It may also temporarily elevate blood pressure or eye pressure for patients with glaucoma. You should discuss this with your physician.

The doctor  will perform the procedure reviews your medical history and previous imaging studies to plan the best location for the injections. Be prepared to ask any questions you may have at this appointment.

Patients who take aspirin or a blood thinning medication may need to stop taking it several days before the procedure. Discuss any medications with your doctors, including the one who prescribed the medication and the doctor who will perform the injection.

Most patients can walk around immediately after the procedure. After being monitored for a short time, you can usually leave. Someone must drive you home.

Patients typically resume full activity the next day. Soreness around the injection site may be relieved by using ice and taking a mild analgesic

You may want to record your levels of pain during the next couple of weeks in a diary. You may notice a slight increase in pain as the numbing medicine wears off and before the corticosteroid starts to take effect.

With few risks, steroid joint injections are considered an appropriate nonsurgical treatment for some patients. The potential risks associated with inserting the needle include bleeding, infection, allergic reaction, headache, and nerve damage (rare). 

Our goal is to help the patient regain their quality of life

In our pain clinic, we provide pain relief so you can regain your identity.